Melkor humiliated Tulkas : (The Book of lost tale : 14 of the theft of melko and darkening of valinor)

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Indeed it might have come to battle upon the plain betwixt Tulkas and Melko had not the distance been overgreat, so that even as Tulkas gained to within spearcast of Melko a belt of mist took the fugitives again and the mocking laugh of Melko seems to come first from one side and then from the other, now from his elbow almost, now from far ahead, and Tulkas turns wildly about and Melko slips away.

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Tulkas was humiliated by Ungoliant :

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And Tulkas was as one caught in a black net at night, and he stood powerless and beat the air in vain.

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So a fellew of Melkor overwhelmed him, and stood powerless and couldn’t scatter the darkness as he did before , neigther any of the valar

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Then the pursuit [of Melkor and Ungoliant] was begun; and the earth shook beneath the horses of the host of Oromë, and the fire that was stricken from the hooves of Nahar was the first light that returned to Valinor. But so soon as any came up with the Cloud of Ungoliant the riders of the Valar were blinded and dismayed, and they were scattered and Valaroma(horn of Orome) faltered and failed.

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All the Valar and atop of them Manwe neigther Varda couldn’t penetrate the darkness that was beyond dark holding Melkor and Ungoliant.

in the book of lost tales , all the valar followed melkor but he made them lost and weren’t able to catch him and Ulmo and Manwe tried to expel the Ungoliant clouds and couldn’t

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Book of the lost tales (the chaining of Melkor)

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Melko attempts to stop them but is unsuccessful. Instead, he slams the gates of Utumna in their faces.
 
 With a blast of his horn, Oromë throws open the gates of Utumna, and Manwë orders Melko to come forward. Though Melko hears Manwë’s plea, he sends forth a servant to provide his answer. Feigning fawning regard, Melko sends his regrets that he cannot welcome his peers into his home, but it lacks the splendor to which they have become accustomed in Valinor. In fact, it is too small to hold more than two of them at a time. And while he is willing to accommodate two of them, he asks that they not be Manwë and Tulkas, who will surely demand better accommodations than he can provide. He adds that he will allow Manwë’s herald Nornorë to speak on the behalf of the Valar, explaining why they have left behind their lazy lives in Valinor to come to where Melko humbly labors.
 
 The Valar are angry at Melko’s subtle defiance, but they withhold their rage and, on Manwë’s advice, decide to use Melko’s pride as a means to gain his audience. Sending forth Nornorë, he explains that the Valar are troubled by what they have done to upset Melko to the degree that he is ravaging the world in his rage. They seek his pardon and wish him to come live among them in Valinor, where Aulë will build him a house taller than Taniquetil.
 
 Melko’s pride overtakes his judgment when he hears this, and he says that he will grant them pardon so long as they set aside their weapons, show deference to him in Utumna, and allow him to banish Tulkas from Valinor. The Valar feign to agree with this, offering Tulkas as a slave in chains, which Melko accepts.
 
 Draping Tulkas with the chain Angaino forged by Aulë and setting aside their weapons, the Valar go forward into Utumna. Melko demands that the Valar kneel at his feet one by one, beginning with Manwë and ending with Tulkas, and Manwë goes so far as to begin to perpetuate the ruse and starts to kneel. Tulkas and Aulë are wrathful at seeing Manwë humiliated so, and they spring forward–with Oromë close behind–and grapple Melko and wrap him in the chain Angaino.

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